IB-CAS  > 植被与环境变化国家重点实验室
Soil indigenous nutrients increase the resilience of maize yield to climatic warming in China
Deng, Xi1; Huang, Yao1; Qin, Zhangcai2,3,4
2020
Source PublicationENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS
ISSN1748-9326
Volume15Issue:9
AbstractClimate warming leads to crop yield loss. Although investigations have shown the region-specific effect of climate warming on maize yield in China, the determinants of this region-specific effect are poorly known. Using county-level data from 1980 to 2010 for China, we investigated the dependence of yield change under climate warming on soil indigenous nutrients. Analysis of the data indicated an average decrease of 2.6% in maize yield for 1 degrees C warming. Warming-related yield loss occurred mostly in western China, the North China Plain, and the southwest region of Northeast China. By contrast, climate warming did not decline maize yield in the northern region of Northeast China, south, and southwest China. Summer maize is more sensitive to warming than spring maize. A 1 degrees C warming resulted in an average loss of 3.3% for summer maize and 1.8% for spring maize. The region-specific change in yield can be well quantified by a combination of soil indigenous total nitrogen (STN), available phosphorus (SAP), and available potassium (SAK). Under climate warming, maize yields in regions with high STN generally increased, while the risk of yield reduction appeared in regions with high SAK. Areas that were vulnerable (defined as a yield loss higher than 1% for a 1 degrees C increase) to climate warming accounted for 62%, while areas that showed resilience (defined as a yield increase higher than 1% for a 1 degrees C increase) to climate warming accounted for 27% of the planting area. An increase in nitrogen fertilizer application is expected to reduce the risk of yield reduction in regions with low STN. Our findings highlight soil resilience to climate warming and underline the practice of fertilizer management to mitigate yield loss due to climate warming.
Keywordmaize yield climate change temperature sensitivity soil indigenous nutrients resilience
Subject AreaEnvironmental Sciences ; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
DOI10.1088/1748-9326/aba4c8
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS KeywordHEAT-STRESS ; CROP YIELD ; TEMPERATURE ; NITROGEN ; FERTILIZER ; IMPACT ; GRAIN ; PHOTOSYNTHESIS ; SENSITIVITY ; GROWTH
WOS Research AreaEnvironmental Sciences & Ecology ; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
WOS IDWOS:000565757400001
PublisherIOP PUBLISHING LTD
SubtypeArticle
Publication PlaceBRISTOL
Funding OrganizationNational Natural Science Foundation of ChinaNational Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) [41530533]
Corresponding Author Emailhuangyao@ibcas.ac.cn
OAgold
Citation statistics
Cited Times:1[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.ibcas.ac.cn/handle/2S10CLM1/21602
Collection植被与环境变化国家重点实验室
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Bot, State Key Lab Vegetat & Environm Change, Beijing 100093, Peoples R China
2.Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China
3.Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Atmospher Sci, Zhuhai 519000, Peoples R China
4.Sun Yat Sen Univ, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Climate Change & Nat Disas, Zhuhai 519000, Peoples R China
5.Southern Marine Sci & Engn Guangdong Lab Zhuhai, Zhuhai 519000, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Deng, Xi,Huang, Yao,Qin, Zhangcai. Soil indigenous nutrients increase the resilience of maize yield to climatic warming in China[J]. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS,2020,15(9).
APA Deng, Xi,Huang, Yao,&Qin, Zhangcai.(2020).Soil indigenous nutrients increase the resilience of maize yield to climatic warming in China.ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS,15(9).
MLA Deng, Xi,et al."Soil indigenous nutrients increase the resilience of maize yield to climatic warming in China".ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS 15.9(2020).
Files in This Item:
File Name/Size DocType Version Access License
Deng-2020-Soil indig(1983KB)期刊论文出版稿开放获取CC BY-NC-SAView Application Full Text
Related Services
Recommend this item
Bookmark
Usage statistics
Export to Endnote
Google Scholar
Similar articles in Google Scholar
[Deng, Xi]'s Articles
[Huang, Yao]'s Articles
[Qin, Zhangcai]'s Articles
Baidu academic
Similar articles in Baidu academic
[Deng, Xi]'s Articles
[Huang, Yao]'s Articles
[Qin, Zhangcai]'s Articles
Bing Scholar
Similar articles in Bing Scholar
[Deng, Xi]'s Articles
[Huang, Yao]'s Articles
[Qin, Zhangcai]'s Articles
Terms of Use
No data!
Social Bookmark/Share
File name: Deng-2020-Soil indigenous nutrients increase t.pdf
Format: Adobe PDF
This file does not support browsing at this time
All comments (0)
No comment.
 

Items in the repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.